My Kemetic Dreams
Haitian Voodoo believers pray in a mud pool in a ceremony during the Plain Du Nord Festival July 24,2008. Haitian Vodou, called Sevis Gineh or “African Service”, is the primary culture and religion of the approximately 7 million people of Haiti and the Haitian diaspora. It has its primary roots among the Fon-Ewe peoples of West Africa, in the country now known as Benin, formerly the Kingdom of Dahomey. It also has strong elements from the Ibo and Kongo peoples of Central Africa and the Yoruba of Nigeria, though many different peoples or “nations” of Africa have representation in the liturgy of the Sevis Gineh, as do the Taino Indians, the original peoples of the island we now know as Hispaniola. Haitian Vodou exists in Haiti, the Dominican Republic, parts of Cuba, the United States, France, Montreal, and other places that Haitian immigrants have dispersed to over the years.Other New World traditions it is closely related to or bears resemblance to include Jeje Vodun in Brazil, La Regla Arara in Cuba, and the Black Spiritualist Christian churches of New Orleans. Haitian Vodou also bears superficial resemblances in many ways with the Nigerian Yoruba-derived traditions of Orisha service, represented by La Regla de Ocha or Lukumi, aka “Santeria”, in Cuba, the United States, and Puerto Rico as well as Candomble in Brazil. While popularly thought of as related to Haitian Vodou, what is commonly referred to as “voodoo” in New Orleans and the southern US is a variant of the word “hoodoo”, also called “rootwork” or “root doctoring”. This is a folk magical tradition from Central Africa in the Congo region in which roots, leaves, minerals, and the spirits of the dead are employed to improve the lot of the living, often including the reciting of Psalms and other Biblical prayers. Rootwork also incorporates Native American herb lore and European and Jewish magical traditions. As a folk magic tradition, New Orleans “voodoo” and southern “hoodoo” root work are distinct from the RELIGION of Haitian Vodou and its siblings and cousins.
 — with Qawi Walters and 46 others.
Haitian Voodoo believers pray in a mud pool in a ceremony during the Plain Du Nord Festival July 24,2008. Haitian Vodou, called Sevis Gineh or “African Service”, is the primary culture and religion of the approximately 7 million people of Haiti and the Haitian diaspora. It has its primary roots among the Fon-Ewe peoples of West Africa, in the country now known as Benin, formerly the Kingdom of Dahomey. It also has strong elements from the Ibo and Kongo peoples of Central Africa and the Yoruba of Nigeria, though many different peoples or “nations” of Africa have representation in the liturgy of the Sevis Gineh, as do the Taino Indians, the original peoples of the island we now know as Hispaniola. Haitian Vodou exists in Haiti, the Dominican Republic, parts of Cuba, the United States, France, Montreal, and other places that Haitian immigrants have dispersed to over the years.
Other New World traditions it is closely related to or bears resemblance to include Jeje Vodun in Brazil, La Regla Arara in Cuba, and the Black Spiritualist Christian churches of New Orleans. Haitian Vodou also bears superficial resemblances in many ways with the Nigerian Yoruba-derived traditions of Orisha service, represented by La Regla de Ocha or Lukumi, aka “Santeria”, in Cuba, the United States, and Puerto Rico as well as Candomble in Brazil. While popularly thought of as related to Haitian Vodou, what is commonly referred to as “voodoo” in New Orleans and the southern US is a variant of the word “hoodoo”, also called “rootwork” or “root doctoring”. This is a folk magical tradition from Central Africa in the Congo region in which roots, leaves, minerals, and the spirits of the dead are employed to improve the lot of the living, often including the reciting of Psalms and other Biblical prayers. Rootwork also incorporates Native American herb lore and European and Jewish magical traditions. As a folk magic tradition, New Orleans “voodoo” and southern “hoodoo” root work are distinct from the RELIGION of Haitian Vodou and its siblings and cousins.

— with Qawi Walters and 46 others.

  1. sonrisasaccidentales reblogged this from kemetic-dreams
  2. cjjones22 reblogged this from kemetic-dreams
  3. shit-you-dont-need-to-read reblogged this from kemetic-dreams
  4. lamodecerveau reblogged this from kemetic-dreams
  5. ballonboyd reblogged this from kemetic-dreams
  6. gwadjanbel reblogged this from kemetic-dreams
  7. kemetic-dreams reblogged this from kemetic-dreams
  8. ofatara reblogged this from kemetic-dreams
  9. tribalmaiden13 reblogged this from mamaruehh
  10. whimsicalblackchick reblogged this from kemetic-dreams and added:
    Haitian Voodoo believers pray in a mud pool in a ceremony during the Plain Du Nord Festival July 24,2008. Haitian Vodou,...
  11. black-humanity reblogged this from noireskin
  12. siccksadgirl reblogged this from noireskin
  13. noireskin reblogged this from shabakaaa
  14. chroniclesofatrick reblogged this from shabakaaa
  15. section8dweller reblogged this from shabakaaa
  16. shabakaaa reblogged this from kemetic-dreams
  17. luciferbeforesunrise reblogged this from hoodoo-seed
  18. themamatproject reblogged this from rivermumma
  19. rivermumma reblogged this from mamaruehh
  20. dawtaofsehkmet reblogged this from hoodoo-seed
  21. mamaruehh reblogged this from hoodoo-seed
  22. hoodoo-seed reblogged this from kemetic-dreams
  23. nosleepforlife reblogged this from kemetic-dreams
  24. thatssomedetroitshit reblogged this from kemetic-dreams
  25. loftparty reblogged this from kemetic-dreams
  26. keepongivin reblogged this from kemetic-dreams
  27. refaultmiami reblogged this from apparentlyaries